Roots grow down so shoots can flirt / Des racines et des ailes

 Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

If you know whence you came, there are absolutely no limitations to where you can go.

James Baldwin

If last week left me anxious and worried about the world our children will inherit, this past weekend filled me with hope.

I attended the inaugural conference of the newly-founded Irish Forest School Association, held in the Irish National Heritage Park, Co Wexford. And I came out full of hope and optimism. Listening to so many grounded, knowledgeable and experienced forest school practitioners was nothing short of inspirational.

Learner-centred

At a time when the world is becoming increasingly polarised, and frankly dangerous, I found myself among passionate people who care for humanity and for the environment, educators who exude empathy and respect and optimism.

Forest school is at the forefront of a grassroots movement that challenges the heartless standardisation of modern education, with its ‘fit-the-mould, or-else’ approach. 

 Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Jon Cree during his keynote speech at the crannóg / Jon Cree a donné son discours au crannóg.

Come to think of it, the skills taught in schools are pretty limited in scope, leaving little space and even less time for fostering imagination and creativity. Besides, who designs the national curriculum? ‘I wonder how this was all agreed upon. Who decided the important things a human needs to know to have a successful life, and when they ought to know them?’ ponders unschooling mum of four Sara in her article What a six-year-old should know.

With its learner-centred ethos, ‘forest school promotes wellness and provides a counterpoint to testing’, IFSA chairperson Joan Whelan explained in her opening address.

‘We are learning machines’, stressed Jon Cree in his keynote speech. ‘Learning is what the brain does. But judgement, i.e. testing, switches off learning.’

One of the founders of the Forest School Association in the UK, Jon is an environmental educator who now works outdoors with teenagers with challenging behaviour. In his mouth, the government-imposed learning outcomes sounded like a dirty word.

Play to learn

Forest school is about purposeful play in a woodland environment – ‘children exploring, taking on challenges and using their imaginations, while all the time managing the risks for themselves’, Jon adds. For children learn better outside.

Play is not frivolous. Play is not a luxury.
It is not something to fit in after completing all the important stuff.
Play is the important stuff.
Play is a drive, a need, a brain-building must-do.

Jeff A. Johnson & Denita Dinger

Forest school is also about connection – connection to nature, to others and community, and to ancestral knowledge and traditions, now mostly forgotten.

There are currently 150 forest school practitioners in Ireland, and their number is on the rise. Many crèches and preschools around the country now take the children outside for some wild time. Even with the strict demands of the national curriculum, several primary schools have started offering forest school sessions to their students.

A limited outside space, or lack thereof, should not be an obstacle. As Brian Poots, founder of the Northern Ireland Forest School Association (NIFSA), puts it, ‘You only need a bush in a corner of the school grounds to get started. No trees? Plant some and watch them grow. Or use the local park and see how the children get a sense of ownership of their forest school site’. 

Where there is a will, there is a way… And I, along with other parents, certainly have the will to introduce forest school to the acorns’ primary school.

Natural habitat

My interest in forest school goes back to our expat days in Denmark – Scandinavia is the historical birthplace of forest school.

During our third and last year in Copenhagen, Jedi, then 3, attended a small skovbørnehave (forest kindergarten) for a year. When it dawned on us that he wouldn’t get a place in the international preschool we had chosen, a leaflet for the Søllerød Skovbørnehave somehow fell between my hands.

Despite the language barrier, Jedi thrived, and the forest became his natural habitat, whatever the weather. He thrived, and the experience opened my mind to the boundless world of outdoor learning. A world where children roam and play freely, explore nature with all their senses alert, and learn vital life skills along the way.

To this day the lovely forest certificate he received on his last day hangs on his bedroom wall.

On moving to Ireland in late 2010, I could find nothing remotely similar to a Danish skovbørnehave. For two years Mermaid attended a Montessori crèche where the outdoor space was the size of a postage stamp, and only used in good weather. Thirty metres across the road beyond the green, there was a stream, lined with tall trees, which she never once visited with her playschool group.

It was about the time I first heard of Ciara Hinksman, of Earth Force Education, and of her efforts to bring forest school to Ireland. In 2014, Jedi and Mermaid finally got the opportunity to attend one of her forest camps, and I, to meet Ciara. Always the trailblazer, she has been instrumental in setting up the IFSA, of which she is now the founding chair.

In 2014, Ireland’s first outdoor crèche opened up on our doorstep (well, nearly) when Squirrel reached preschool age. He spent two happy years roaming the woods and climbing up the trees of the Nature Kindergarten, located on the grounds of Killruddery, Bray, Co Wicklow. Now that Squirrel is in school, Pebbles goes “to the forest” every day.

IFSA-Irish-Forest-School-Association

In this age of “nature deficit disorder”, a phrase coined by American author Richard Louv in Last Child in the Woods, I want my four acorns to grow up feeling at home in nature. After all, even in this technology-mad world, the best toy ever remains the humble stick.

 

IFSA-Irish-Forest-School-Association crannog-Irish-National-Heritage-Park

 Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

IFSA chairperson Joan Whelan / Joan Whelan, présidente de l’IFSA

 Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt  Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt  Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Jon Cree and Brian Poots (NIFSA) by the fire / Jon Cree et Brian Poots (Association d’école de la forêt d’Irlande du Nord) autour du feu.

 Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt  Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

 Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt  Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt  Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Marina Robb (Circle of Life Rediscovery)

crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

 

Additional information

Irish Forest School Association
Email irishforestschoolassociation@gmail.com
Facebook @IrishForestSchoolAssociation

The IFSA is a voluntary run organisation which aims to support the development of quality forest school learning across Ireland. 

Fostering ‘more holistic and progressive ways of learning for us all’, it is based on six core principles, which Lauren, of The Helpful Hiker, details in her excellent introduction to Forest School.

  • Forest school offers learners the opportunity to take supported risks. According to Jon Cree, ‘the risk zone is where the learning happens’.
  • Forest school is a long-term process, with frequent and regular sessions to a local natural space, ideally through the seasons.
  • Forest school takes place in a woodland to develop and support a relationship with the natural world.
  • Forest school promotes the holistic development of all involved, fostering resilient, confident, independent and creative learners.
  • Forest school aims to create a community of learning, based on play and choice. Learners and practitioners are on an equal footing, as opposed to the teacher/student, from the top down, model.
  • Forest school is run by qualified practitioners, who constantly reflect on and develop their practice.

 

Earth Force Education
Tel. +353 0863199515
Email info@earthforceeducation.com
Facebook @earthforceeducation

Since founding Earth Force Education in 2009, Ciara Hinksman has been on a mission to share her love of nature with the next generation, working with primary schools, community groups and anyone else that appreciates her vision.
For all information about her forest camps and family days, please visit Earth Force Education’s website.

Should you want to become a qualified forest school practitioner, Earth Force Education also provide the Level 3 Forest School Leader training, in collaboration with Marina Robb of Circle of Life Rediscovery.

IFSA-Irish-Forest-School-Association

Ciara Hinksman (Earth Force Education)

Two days before the IFSA’s inaugural conference was the first Outdoor Classroom Day of the year. This global campaign celebrates and inspires outdoor learning and play. On the day, thousands of schools around the world take lessons outdoors and prioritise playtime – over 1 million children got involved this time. There are two more days scheduled for 2017, on 7th September and 12th October.

Recommended reading

      

           Learning with Nature                 Last Child in the Woods           Free to Learn

Disclosure: This post contains some affiliate links. Should you choose to make a purchase after clicking on one of them, I may receive a small commission and your purchase will help support this site.


Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Si tu sais d’où tu viens, il n’y a aucune limite à là où tu peux aller.

James Baldwin

Si la semaine dernière m’a laissée désemparée quant au monde dont nos enfants hériteront, le weekend passé m’a remplie d’espoir.

J’ai assisté à la conférence inaugurale de l’Association irlandaise de l’Ecole de la Forêt (Irish Forest School  Association, ou IFSA), qui se tenait au Parc national du Patrimoine irlandais (Irish National Heritage Park), Co Wexford. J’en suis revenue pleine d’espoir et d’optimisme. Ces intervenants d’école de la forêt, pleins de sagesse, d’expérience et d’esprit pratique, sont une immense source d’inspiration. 

Machines à apprendre

En ce jour où le monde se déchire chaque jour un peu plus, je me suis retrouvée parmi des personnes qui partagent une vision rassurante pour l’avenir de l’humanité et de l’environnement, des éducateurs passionnés qui respirent l’empathie, le respect et l’optimisme.

L’école de la forêt est un mouvement à la popularité croissante qui remet en question la standardisation impitoyable des systèmes éducatifs modernes, au sein desquels les progrès doivent être linéaires, et les acquis quantifiables.

Quand on y pense, les écoles enseignent une gamme plutôt limitée de matières, qui laisse peu de place et encore moins de temps pour cultiver l’imaginaire et la créativité. A ce propos, qui établit les programmes éducatifs ? “Je me demande comment tout cela a été déterminé. Qui a décidé des choses importantes qu’un être humain doit savoir pour réussir sa vie, et quand ces choses doivent être apprises ?” s’interroge Sara, mère de quatre filles non-scolarisées, dans son article de blog What a six year old should know.

Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Avec sa philosophie centrée sur l’apprenant, l’école de la forêt “cherche à promouvoir le bien-être, tout en fournissant un contrepoint aux évaluations”, expliqua Joan Whelan, présidente de l’IFSA.

“Nous sommes des machines à apprendre”, insista Jon Cree dans son discours d’inauguration. “Le cerveau est toujours en train d’apprendre. C’est quand on mesure les acquis (par des évaluations) que l’apprentissage s’interrompt.”

Un des fondateurs de l’Association d’école de la forêt (Forest School Association) en Grande-Bretagne, Jon travaille en plein air avec des pré-adolescents en échec scolaire et social. Dans sa bouche, l’obsession actuelle avec les résultats d’apprentissage sonne comme un juron.

Eh bien jouez maintenant !

L’école de la forêt encourage le jeu libre dans les bois, c’est-à-dire “des enfants qui explorent, qui testent leurs limites et utilisent leur imagination, tout en gérant les risques eux-mêmes”, précise Jon Cree. Car les enfants apprennent mieux dehors.

Le jeu n’est pas frivole. Le jeu n’est pas un luxe.
Ce n’est pas quelque chose qu’on case après avoir terminé toutes les choses importantes.
Le jeu est la chose importante.
Le jeu est un instinct, un besoin, un devoir neuroconstructeur.

Jeff A. Johnson & Denita Dinger

L’école de la forêt cultive aussi la connexion : connexion à la nature bien sûr, mais aussi aux autres et à la communauté, et aux connaissances et traditions ancestrales, aujourd’hui oubliées.

L’Irlande compte quelque 150 intervenants de l’école de la forêt, et ce chiffre ne cesse d’augmenter. Dans tout le pays, nombreuses sont les crèches et maternelles qui emmènent les enfants en pleine nature. Malgré les contraintes du programme de l’Education nationale, plusieurs écoles primaires proposent désormais des séances école de la forêt à leurs élèves.

Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Teacher Jenny Dungan introduced forest school in her primary school /
Jenny Dungan, institutrice, a introduit un cursus école de la forêt dans son école primaire.

Le manque ou l’absence d’espace extérieur adapté est souvent un obstacle à surmonter. Ce à quoi Brian Poots, fondateur de l’Association de l’école de la forêt en Irlande du Nord (NIFSA), répond : “Il suffit d’un buisson dans un recoin de l’école. S’il n’y a pas d’arbre, plantez-en. Ou utilisez le parc public et voyez comme les enfants s’approprient peu à peu le site d’école de la forêt”.

Quand on veut, on peut… Or j’ai bien l’intention, avec d’autres parents, d’introduire l’école de la forêt dans l’établissement des graines de chêne.

Habitat naturel

Mon intérêt pour la philosophie de l’école de la forêt remonte à notre expatriation au Danemark. Car c’est en Scandinavie que l’école de la forêt a vu le jour.

Durant notre troisième et dernière année à Copenhague, Jedi, alors âgé de 3 ans, fréquenta un petit skovbørnehave (jardin d’enfants en forêt) pendant un an. Au moment où sa place à la maternelle internationale que nous avions choisie lui était refusée, l’humble prospectus du Søllerød Skovbørnehave me tomba entre les mains.

Malgré la barrière de la langue, Jedi s’y épanouit, et la forêt devint son milieu naturel, par tous les temps. Il s’épanouit, et cette expérience m’ouvrit les portes du monde sans bornes de l’apprentissage en plein air. Un monde où les enfants bougent et jouent librement, explorent la nature avec tous leurs sens en éveil, et apprennent ainsi des compétences vitales.

A ce jour, le joli certificat qu’il reçut à son dernier jour reste accroché sur le mur de sa chambre.

Lors de notre installation en Irlande à l’automne 2010, je cherchai, en vain, une structure similaire à un skovbørnehave danois. Pendant deux ans, Sirène fréquenta une petite crèche Montessori ; la cour, de la taille d’un timbre-poste, n’était utilisée que par beau temps. A 30 mètres de la crèche, de l’autre côté de la route, un ruisseau coulait sous les arbres en bordure du lotissement. Les enfants de la crèche n’y sont jamais allés.

C’est à cette époque que j’ai entendu parler pour la première fois de Ciara Hinksman, fondatrice de Earth Force Education et pionnière de l’école de la forêt en Irlande. En 2014, Jedi et Sirène eurent enfin la chance de participer à un de ses camps en forêt, et moi, de rencontrer Ciara. Elle a depuis piloté la création de l’IFSA, dont elle est la présidente fondatrice.

IFSA-Irish-Forest-School-Association Earth-Force-Education

En 2014, la première crèche en plein air d’Irlande a ouvert sur le pas de notre porte (presque), juste au moment où Ecureuil était en âge d’y aller. Il a passé deux ans à explorer les bois et à grimper aux arbres du Nature Kindergarten, situé sur le domaine de Killruddery, à Bray, Co Wicklow. Maintenant qu’Ecureuil est en primaire, c’est Caillou qui va “dans la forêt” tous les jours.

Au sein de cette génération d’enfants perdus sans la nature, pour reprendre le titre de François Cardinal, journaliste au quotidien québécois La Presse, je veux que mes graines de chêne se sentent à l’aise en pleine nature. Car même à notre époque saturée de technologie, le meilleur jouet du monde reste le simple bâton.

 

crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Making ropes with nettle fiber /
Fabrication de corde avec de la fibre d’ortie

crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

crannog, Irish National Heritage Park, IFSA, Irish Forest School Association, forest school, outdoor learning, Ireland, Irlande, école de la forêt

Nettle & wild garlic pesto /
Pesto d’ortie et d’ail des ours

En savoir plus

Irish Forest School Association
Email irishforestschoolassociation@gmail.com
Facebook @IrishForestSchoolAssociation

L’IFSA est une association à but non lucratif dont le but est de promouvoir le développement de l’école de la forêt en Irlande. Encourageant des “façons d’apprendre holistiques et progressives pour tous”, l’école de la forêt repose sur six principes fondateurs :

  • Elle permet aux apprenants de prendre des risques tout en étant encadrés. Car “c’est dans la prise de risque que l’apprentissage se produit”, précise Jon Cree.
  • Elle implique un processus à long terme, avec des séances fréquentes et régulières dans un milieu boisé local, de préférence au fil des saisons.
  • Elle a lieu dans les bois afin de développer et de maintenir une relation avec le monde naturel.
  • Elle encourage l’épanouissement holistique de toutes les personnes impliquées, créant ainsi des apprenants endurants, confiants, indépendants et créatifs. 
  • Elle vise à créer une communauté d’apprentissage, basée sur le choix et le jeu. Les apprenants et les intervenants se trouvent sur un pied d’égalité, et non pas dans la relation d’autorité prédominante dans le système scolaire.
  • Elle est conduite par des intervenants qualifiés, investis dans un effort de réflection et de développement continu.

 

Earth Force Education
Tel. +353 0863199515
Email info@earthforceeducation.com
Facebook @earthforceeducation

Depuis la fondation de Earth Force Education en 2009, Ciara Hinksman partage son amour de la nature avec la jeune génération, intervenant dans les écoles primaires, au sein de groupes communautaires et auprès de quiconque apprécie sa vision du monde. Pour tous renseignements sur ses stages en forêt, ses journées familiales, et bien sûr, la formation d’intervenant en école de la forêt, veuillez consulter son site.

Deux jours avant la conférence de l’IFSA, avait lieu la Journée École en Plein Air. Cette action mondiale est destinée à encourager tous les enfants à apprendre et à jouer en plein air. Elle se tient déjà dans plus de 50 pays à travers le globe. Les écoles et/ou les enseignants sont encouragés à organiser au moins une leçon ou une activité en plein air ce jour-là. Cette fois, plus d’un million d’enfants y ont participé. Deux autres dates sont prévues pour 2017 : le 7 septembre et le 12 octobre.

A lire

Perdus sans la nature
Disponible sur Amazon.frLa sédentarité est le mal du siècle. Et tout le monde le constate, les enfants bougent de moins en moins, jouent de moins en moins dehors. Mais est-ce un problème ? Certainement, répond François Cardinal. Dans ce premier essai québécois sur le sujet, le journaliste brosse un portrait saisissant de la disparition progressive de la nature dans la vie de nos enfants et des problèmes de santé qui en découlent : obésité, hyperactivité, désordres liés au stress, haute pression, diabète, etc. Heureusement, François Cardinal fait plus que cerner la problématique et ses nuances, il propose également de judicieuses pistes de solution.

Les enfants des bois
Disponible sur Amazon.frEn quoi est-ce important de sortir dans la nature avec des enfants ? Comment y animer un groupe ? Comment se sont formés les jardins d’enfants et les écoles enfantines dans la nature ? Comment se déroule une journée au sein d’un jardin d’enfants dans la nature ? Comment fonder un projet en nature avec de jeunes enfants ? Comment convaincre les parents et les autorités du bien-fondé des sorties ?
Ce livre apporte des pistes de réflexion sur ces questions et sur d’autres. Il propose des naissances de base et des idées pour mettre sur pied un jardin d’enfants dans la nature, une école enfantine dans la forêt, des sorties régulières dans la nature avec une école maternelle ou une crèche. Il s’adresse à tous ceux qui aimeraient travailler dehors avec des enfants de 3 à 7 ans.

Pour une éducation buissonnière
Disponible sur Amazon.frNous privons de plus en plus nos enfants de la nature, du dehors, les acheminant peu à peu vers une éducation “hors-sol”. Et ceci au nom de la sécurité, de l’hygiène, de la norme, du risque zéro, et sous le prétexte fallacieux que, par écrans interposés, la vie, le réel, arrivent désormais sans risques jusqu’au coeur de douillettes petites cages dorées où nous les gardons à l’abri. Or le monde n’est pas réductible aux murs de la chambre ou de la classe, ni à des images virtuelles, les plus perfectionnées soient-elles.
C’est dehors, dans le jardin, les prés et les bois, au bord de la mer ou en montagne, dans ce contact plein avec le réel que l’enfant construit une part considérable de son rapport à son corps, à ses sens, à son intelligence, à la vie et aux autres. C’est là qu’il développe au mieux la totalité de son être.
Avec son style vif et souvent fougueux, Louis Espinassous plaide pour l’éducation nature en connaissance de cause : il la pratique au quotidien avec passion depuis quarante ans.
Pour une éducation buissonnière est un témoignage riche d’expériences et de réflexions. C’est aussi une vigoureuse exhortation au développement de cette éducation nature pour que chaque enfant puisse grandir sur la planète Terre, homme parmi les hommes, et aller vers une humanité plus solidaire et respectueuse des ressources limitées et de la beauté du monde.

Avertissement : Cet article contient des liens partenaires. Si vous décidez d’effectuer un achat après avoir cliqué sur l’un d’eux, je recevrai une petite commission et votre achat aidera à soutenir ce site.

crannog, Irish National Heritage Park

 

 

Two Tiny Hands
 
diaryofanimperfectmum    Cuddle Fairy    Tammymum   ethannevelyn.com 
life as our little familyReflections From Me Rhyming with Wine Blog Crush linky on lucyathome.co.uk

16 Responses to “Roots grow down so shoots can flirt / Des racines et des ailes

  • Linda Boulet
    7 months ago

    Superbe article… Je te rejoins en bien des points en ce qui concerne le système éducatif. J’adhère de plus en plus difficilement au système français et retrouve de moins en moins mes valeurs dans celles de l’Education Nationale. Je n’envisage pas encore un changement de profession, mais plutôt une nouvelle façon d’enseigner qui consisterait à laisser s’épanouir les talents de chaque enfant, qu’ils soient liés aux domaines scolaires ou non, plutôt que de chercher à faire entrer un maximum de mes élèves dans des “cases” déterminées par des “pontes” qui n’y connaissent finalement pas grand-chose en matière de développement infantile… Je me bats à ma toute petite échelle, contre bon nombre de mes collègues pour faire un peu évoluer les mentalités mais une carrière entière n’y suffira sans doute pas… J’ignore si des associations similaires à Irish Forest School Association existent en France mais le concept me parle, me plait et m’inspire…
    Gros bisous
    Linda

    • Difficile de dire à quel point ton commentaire me fait plaisir. Qu’une enseignante aussi passionnée que toi en arrive à douter de sa carrière prouve bien que quelque chose ne tourne pas rond dans l’Education nationale. Tu n’es pas la seule : ton expérience rejoint celle de milliers d’enseignants dans nombre de pays ! Continue de te battre, même à ta petite échelle, comme tu dis. Le changement se fera par le bas de toute façon. Et les enfants méritent tellement mieux que le système actuel.
      N’hésite pas à partager cet article où bon te semble. Il n’y a peut-être pas encore d’école de la forêt en France, mais c’est une approche à la fois locale et internationale qui commence à fleurir un peu partout. Et tout commence par une prise de conscience…

  • Oh Wow! Lucky you! I wish I there would be a Forest School near us. It looks very interesting and that you have learnt a lot from the day. I can see your boy is loving it too. Good for you. x #mg
    Su {Ethan & Evelyn} recently posted…The Color Obstacle Rush – Doing It For The Kids!

    • There might be a forest school near you, in a different shape or form from the ones my children have attended, but it may be there.
      Thanks for stopping by 🙂

  • I am a trained Forest School leader and set one up from scratch about 10 years ago. I absolutely LOVE the theory behind them and have seen what they can do for children of all ages. This is a fabulous post and reminded me why I love teaching in the outdoors so much! Thank you. #familyfun

    • Wow thank you for this fantastic comment! Knowing that my post resonated with a trained forest school leader like you really makes my day. Well done on setting up a forest school, I am currently trying to introduce forest school in my kids’ primary school, and it is hard work getting the momentum going. Next year hopefully…

  • I agree there’s not one fits al model when it comes to learning. I find practical lessons so much more fun. #OutdoorBloggers
    Helena recently posted…Things I’ve Liked and Loved in May

    • Or no lessons at all! 😉 I find that having the time and freedom to explore a subject at my own pace makes for much longer lasting learning. My son Squirrel is very much like that too – he doesn’t take instructions very well…
      Thank you for your comment 🙂

  • I love this! Our daughters, here in the US, go to the Miquon School. It offers progressive education, outdoor play and choice, and child led learning. It is amazing and we are so fortunate to have such a school available to us. Looks like you are too! Lovely!

  • This is so inspiring. I love this concept to learning, we’re surrounded by nature here and always take some time to go on exploring and adventures with our little. We don’t have a forest school near us unfortunately, it’s somewhere I’d love to send my little. ‪Thank you for linking up to the #familyfunlinky‬

  • I confess to never having heard of a Forest School, what an inspired idea! Couldn’t agree more that getting back to nature is the perfect antidote to the madness that is surrounding us right now. Thank you so much for such an informative piece and for opening my mind. #mg

  • Oh, Forest schools are great! We also had them in NOrway – so much fun even for grown ups! Thanks for a great article. #FabFridayPosts
    Feeling Mum Yet recently posted…Let’s Discuss CPV openly – Child-on-Parent Violence

  • This looks fabulous – such a great thing Forest Schools are. Thanks for sharing. Sarah #FabFridayPost
    Sarah Stockley recently posted…Ranscombe Farm Reserve

Trackbacks & Pings

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge